Primary Source Strategies: Maps

by admin
  1. Primary Source Strategies: Maps Nwea
  2. Primary Source Strategies
  3. Primary Source Strategies: Maps Satellite

Satellite images are like maps: they are full of useful and interesting information, provided you have a key. They can show us how much a city has changed, how well our crops are growing, where a fire is burning, or when a storm is coming. To unlock the rich information in a satellite image, you need to:

Primary Source Strategies: Maps Nwea

Maps

Strategy, Sources and Sites for Map Section- History Optional Paper I This section is a very grey-area in case of our Optional paper. I have had interaction with many of my peer aspirants. So, if you are an engineer by academic background - this section might seem a cake walk for you. – Maps – GPS. HARN (High Accuracy Reference Network). HPGN (High Precision Geodetic Network). HARN and HPGN are both names for the same project that is focused on readjusting the NAD83 datum to a higher level of accuracy state by state. Internal validation – Simulation.

Primary Source Strategies: Maps
  1. Look for a scale
  2. Look for patterns, shapes, and textures
  3. Define the colors (including shadows)
  4. Find north
  5. Consider your prior knowledge

These tips come from the Earth Observatory’s writers and visualizers, who use them to interpret images daily. They will help you get oriented enough to pull valuable information out of satellite images.

Look for a Scale

Primary source strategies: maps satellite

One of the first things people want to do when they look at a satellite image is identify the places that are familiar to them: their home, school, or place of business; a favorite park or tourist attraction; or a natural feature like a lake, river, or mountain ridge. Some images from military or commercial satellites are detailed enough to show many of these things. Such satellites zoom in on small areas to collect fine details down to the scale of individual houses or cars. In the process, they usually sacrifice the big picture.

Satellite images are like maps: they are full of useful and interesting information, provided you have a key. They can show us how much a city has changed, how well our crops are growing, where a fire is burning, or when a storm is coming. To unlock the rich information in a satellite image, you need to:

Primary Source Strategies

  1. Look for a scale
  2. Look for patterns, shapes, and textures
  3. Define the colors (including shadows)
  4. Find north
  5. Consider your prior knowledge

These tips come from the Earth Observatory’s writers and visualizers, who use them to interpret images daily. They will help you get oriented enough to pull valuable information out of satellite images.

Primary source strategies: maps satellite

Look for a Scale

Primary Source Strategies: Maps Satellite

One of the first things people want to do when they look at a satellite image is identify the places that are familiar to them: their home, school, or place of business; a favorite park or tourist attraction; or a natural feature like a lake, river, or mountain ridge. Some images from military or commercial satellites are detailed enough to show many of these things. Such satellites zoom in on small areas to collect fine details down to the scale of individual houses or cars. In the process, they usually sacrifice the big picture.